2016 NAVC Proceedings

718 Resources on 2016 NAVC Proceedings

Sort By:

Narrow By:

Chicken Skin Disease: 5 Categories and How To Treat Them

chapter-474 The avian integument is comprised of thin skin, feathers, and several other structures. The skin of birds is particularly flexible and thin to allow for weightlessness and movement in flight.1 It is firmly attached to the skull, wing tips, sternum, beak and feet. It is thicker in the featherless areas, and thinner where feathers are overlying. Avian skin lacks true glands with the exception of the uropygial gland (preen gland), a bilobed holocrine gland present at the...

Read More

Common Cancers in Avian Species

chapter-476 Understanding important trends in avian cancer is important for several reasons. For clinicians, it is key to narrowing a differential list and providing information to clients regarding likely scenarios. Also, certain trends are based on causative disease pathogenesis, which may lead to important treatment diseases for individual birds or for colony management for larger aviaries. On the research side, different species trends and etiologies can provide insight into...

Read More

Bactrian and Dromedary Camel Medicine Made Easy

Proceedings Of The NAVC Conference Volume 29 OVERVIEW Until recently, dromedary and bactrian camels (one and two humped camels, respectively) were seldom found outside of zoological institutions in the United States. These days, they are increasingly found in private ownership. They can also be found giving rides at fairs and performing in living Nativity scenes during the holidays. Although closely related to llamas and alpacas, their South American cousins, “Old World Camels”...

Read More

Parasites of Clinical Significance To Wildlife and Public Health

chapter-536 Recent media events (such as hantavirus infections of campers in Yosemite or the multi-state, multi-state outbreak of turtle-associated salmonellosis cases), have made the general public much more aware of diseases associated with animals. In addition, veterinarians should be aware of their relative risk of acquiring these diseases when working with these nontraditional animals. This is highlighted by a recent study that reported that veterinarians are likely at an...

Read More

Emergency Planning for Small Ruminant Clients

Proceedings Of The NAVC Conference Volume 29 The need for disaster planning and preparedness could easily be a third universal truth after death and taxes for small ruminant producers and owners. Whether it’s hurricanes in the Gulf and Atlantic states, wildfires and earthquakes in the West, flooding along the Mississippi Basin, drought conditions in the Southwest, tornado activity in the flyover states, or blizzards in the northern plains, each region of the country is subject to a...

Read More

Adding Exotic Pet Medicine To Your Practice: Fun, Facts and Profits

chapter-500 Increasing revenue and profitable growth has been difficult for many veterinary practices over the past 3 to 5 years. This at a time when the popularity and ownership of exotic animal species continue to grow, yet many veterinarians have been slow to capitalize on this important segment of the market. Many veterinarians question whether there are enough exotic patients/ revenue to make entry into this area of clinical practice profitable, but with a good plan not only...

Read More

BVDV in the Bulk Tank — Now What?

Proceedings Of The NAVC Conference Volume 29 The average number of cows per dairy farm in the United States continues to increase. Growth on dairies may be through either internal (retaining more replacement heifers and limiting culling) or external (purchasing cattle from outside sources) expansion. According to the National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) dairy survey in 2007, nearly 40% of all operations brought outside cattle onto the operation in the previous year. The...

Read More

Development and Validation of an On-farm Scoring System for Bovine Respiratory Disease in Dairy Calves

Proceedings Of The NAVC Conference Volume 29 Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a major source of economic loss for the US cattle industry.1-3 With over a million deaths annually, respiratory disease is the most important endemic disease of US cattle.4 In dairy heifers BRD is responsible for 22% of all pre-weaning deaths, and is the most common cause of post-weaning death.5 In beef cattle, BRD is the most common cause of mortality or loss (31%) in calves over 3 weeks old.6 Precise...

Read More

How Research Has Informed My Clinical Approach To Wildlife Medicine

chapter-535 In 2000, a wildlife health program on St. Catherines Island, other parts of Georgia and surrounding states was developed. Target species have included sea turtles, diamondback terrapins, eastern indigo snakes, alligator snapping turtles, gopher tortoises, American oystercatchers, brown pelicans, and several marine mammal species. As part of this program, we partnered with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Field Veterinary Program on a global sea turtle health...

Read More

Risk Assessment Approach for Control and Prevention of Bovine Respiratory Disease in Dairy Calves

Proceedings Of The NAVC Conference Volume 29 With over a million deaths annually, bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the most important endemic disease of US and a major source of economic losses. 1-4 In dairy heifers BRD is responsible for 22% of all pre weaning deaths, and is the most common cause of post-weaning death.5 In beef cattle, BRD is the most common cause of mortality or loss (31%) in calves over 3 weeks old.6 Precise costs due to BRD in dairy heifers are difficult to...

Read More

Founding Sponsors