Ophthalmology

103 Resources on Ophthalmology

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Ulcerative Keratitits: Mastering Corneal Ulcers

The equine eye is very prominent and particularly prone to traumatic injury and subsequent corneal ulceration. Corneal disease, and especially ulcerative keratitis, is the most common cause for acute ocular pain in the horse. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate medical and surgical therapy should prevent complications.Please note: If you were an attendee at this NAVC Conference and received a general CE certificate, please be sure to check with your state licensing bureau regarding your...

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Dry Eye in Dogs: Give Them Something to Cry About

The lecture will review the normal structure and function of the tear film in dogs by discussing the biochemical make-up, cellular origin, and physiologic functions of normal tears. Syndromes associated with tear film disease will be discussed, including keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS), qualitative tear deficiency, and keratitis (non-ulcerative and ulcerative). Medical and surgical treatment of tear film disease will be extensively discussed.Please note:If you were an attendee at this NAVC...

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The Cornea: Looking Through the Window Pane, or Can I Even See Through It?

Review the normal anatomy and physiology of the cornea and then apply that knowledge to treating the most commonly affected ocular structure seen by primary care practitioners. We will divide corneal disease into simple color categories. We will also spend time working together to examine, diagnose, and treat some clinical cases.This course was originally presented as a session at AAHA Nashville 2017.

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The Retina: The Window to the Inside of Your Patient

The retina is a frequent source of frustration and confusion for practitioners, but examining the retina can reveal a plethora of information about your patient. Learn about techniques for fundoscopy and how to interpret your findings. We will also spend time working together to examine, diagnose and treat some clinical cases.This course was originally presented as a session at AAHA Nashville 2017.

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Diagnosis and Treatment of Uveitis: What Tests Do I Need To Run and Why?

Uveitis may be your first opportunity to diagnose a systemic disease, or may only represent disease confined to the eye. How do you tell the difference? This lecture reviews the common causes of uveitis, appropriate diagnostic testing and how best to select therapeutic options. We will also spend time working together to examine, diagnose, and treat some clinical cases.This course was originally presented as a session at AAHA Nashville 2017.

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Nonhealing Corneal Ulcers in Dogs: Battling the Boxer and Beyond

Please note:If you were an attendee at this NAVC Conference and received a general CE certificate, please be sure to check with your state licensing bureau regarding your eligibility to receive online credit for an individual session.Corneal ulcers are not uncommon in veterinary practice, but how do you know when you’re no longer dealing with an uncomplicated ulcer? How long should it take to heal? What should you do if it isn’t healing as expected? This session describes how to identify and...

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Tarantula Hair Keratoconjunctivitis with Concurrent Fungal Infection in a Rat Terrier (Case Report)

AbstractA 9 yr old rat terrier presented with corneal ulceration and conjunctivitis that developed acutely after digging among dry leaves in wooded northern Arizona. Ophthalmic examination revealed multiple linear foreign bodies throughout the adnexal tissue and cornea of the left eye. Manual removal of material was unsuccessful. The palpebral conjunctiva required excision with tenotomy scissors to remove structures and allow corneal healing. Microscopic examination revealed structures...

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Corneal Ulcers in Horses

AbstractCorneal ulceration is commonly diagnosed by equine veterinarians. A complete ophthalmic examination as well as fluorescein staining, corneal cytology, and corneal bacterial (aerobic) and fungal culture and sensitivity testing are necessary for all infected corneal ulcers. Appropriate topical antibiotics, topical atropine, and systemic NSAIDs are indicated for all corneal ulcers. If keratomalacia (melting) is observed, anticollagenase/antiprotease therapy, such as autologous serum, is...

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